Keystone Federated Swift – Separate Clusters + Container Sync

This is the third post in the series of Keystone Federated Swift. To bounce back to the start you can visit the first post.

Separate Clusters + Container Sync

The idea with this topology is to deploy each of your OpenStack federated clusters each with their own unique swift cluster and then use another swift feature, container sync, to push objects you create on one federated environment to another.

In this case the keystone servers are federated. A very similar topology could be a global Swift cluster, but each proxy only talks to single region’s keystone. Which would mean a user visiting a different region would authenticate via federation and be able to use the swift cluster, however would use a different account name. In both cases container sync could be used to synchronise the objects, say from the federated account to that of the original account. This is because container sync can synchronise both between containers in separate clusters or in the same.

 

Setting up container sync

Setting up container sync is pretty straight forward. And is also well documented. At a high level to goes like this. Firstly you need to setup a trust between the different clusters. This is achieved by creating a container-sync-realms.conf file, the online example is:

[realm1]
key = realm1key
key2 = realm1key2
cluster_clustername1 = https://host1/v1/
cluster_clustername2 = https://host2/v1/

[realm2]
key = realm2key
key2 = realm2key2
cluster_clustername3 = https://host3/v1/
cluster_clustername4 = https://host4/v1/

 

Each realm is a set of different trusts. And you can have as many clusters in a realm as you want, so as youcan see you can build up different realms. In our example we’d only need 1 realm, and lets use some better names.

[MyRealm]
key = someawesomekey
key2 = anotherkey
cluster_blue = https://blueproxyvip/v1
cluster_green = https://greenproxyvip/v1

NOTE: there is nothing stopping you from only having 1 cluster defined as you can use container sync within a cluster, or adding more clusters to a single realm.

 

Now in our example both the green and blue clusters need to have the MyRealm realm defined in their /etc/swift/container-sync-realms.conf file. The 2 keys are there so you can do key rotation. These keys should be kept secret as these keys will be used to define trust between the clusters.

 

The next step is to make sure you have the container_sync middleware in your proxy pipeline. There are 2 parts to container sync, the backend daemon that periodically checks containers for new objects and sends changes to the other cluster, and the middleware that is used to authenticate requests sent by container sync daemons from other clusters. We tend to place the container_sync middleware before (to the left of) any authentication middleware.

 

The last step is to tell container sync what containers to keep in sync. This is all done via container meta-data which is controlled by the user. Let’s assume we have 2 accounts, AUTH_matt on the blue and AUTH_federatedmatt on the green. And we wanted to sync a container called mycontainer. Note, the containers don’t have to be called the same. Then we’d start by making sure the 2 containers have the same container sync key, which is defined by the owner of the container, this isn’t the realm keys but work in a similar way. And then telling 1 container to sync with the other.
NOTE: you can make the relationship go both ways.

 

Let’s use curl first:

$ curl -i -X POST -H 'X-Auth-Token: <token>' \
-H 'X-Container-Sync-Key: secret' \
'http://blueproxyvip/v1/AUTH_matt/mycontainer'

$ curl -i -X POST -H 'X-Auth-Token: <token>' \
-H 'X-Container-Sync-Key: secret' \
-H 'X-Container-Sync-To: //MyRealm/blue/AUTH_matt/mycontainer' \
'http://greenproxyvip/v1/AUTH_federatedmatt/mycontainer'

Or via the swift client, noting that you need to change identities to set each account.

# To the blue cluster for AUTH_matt
$ swift  post -k 'secret' mycontainer

 

# To the green cluster for AUTH_federatedmatt
$ swift  post \
-t '//MyRealm/blue/AUTH_matt/mycontainer' \
-k 'secret' mycontainer

In a federated environment, you’d just need to set some key for each of your containers you want to work on while your away (or all of them I guess). Then when you visit you can just add the sync-to metadata when you create containers on the other side. Likewise, if you knew the name of your account on the other side you could make a sync-to if you needed to work on something over there.

 

To authenticate containersync generates and compares a hmac on both sides where the hmac consists of both the realm and container keys, the verb, object name etc.

 

The obvious next question is great, but then do I need to know the name of each cluster, well yes, but you can simply find them by asking swift via the info call. This is done by hitting the /info swift endpoint with whatever tool you want. If your using the swift client, then it’s:

$ swift info

Pros and cons

Pros

The biggest pro for this approach is you don’t have to do anything special, if you have 1 swift cluster or a bunch throughout your federated environments the all you need to do it setup a container sync trust between them and the users can sync between themselves.

 

Cons

There are a few I can think off the top of my head:

  1. You need to manually set the metadata on each container. Which might be fine if it’s just you, but if you have an app or something it’s something else you need to think about.
  2. Container sync will move the data periodically, so you may not see it in the other container straight away.
  3. More storage is used. If it’s 1 cluster or many, the objects will exist in both accounts.

Conclusion

This is an interesting approach, but I think it would be much better to have access to the same set of objects everywhere I go and it just worked. I’ll talk about how to go about that in the next post as well as talk about 1 specific way I got working as a POC.

 

Container sync is pretty cool, Swiftstack have recently open sourced a another tool 1space, that can do something similar. 1space looks awesome but I haven’t have a chance to play with it yet. And so will add it to the list of Swift things I want to play with whenever I get a chance.